The Danes anno 2019: Green and meat loving

They are big green talkers and slow green walkers. Meat is the king of their kitchen and leftovers are the bomb. It is the deal hunters, we are talking about; it is the Danes anno 2019, a new nationwide study reveals.

96 percent of Danes want to change in order to live more sustainable according to a study by Landbrug & Fødevarer. However, according to results of Madkulturen’s recently published study – presented at a launch event where many Danish Food Cluster members filled the beautiful location of Dansk Industri – the Danes eat meat more frequently.

Meat is still the main character of the Danish dinner-show, while meat-free minced only has a minor role. 8 out of 10 meals include meat – a number which has been on a rise since 2016. And when it comes to the meals that include meat, 54 percent of Danes say that meat is the main ingredient of their meals.

But what if we take a look at the Danes’ shopping baskets? Do they tell another story?

At Salling Group, we experience a growing interest in climate related issues and CO2 footprint in relation to shopping. We simply meet a lot of questions and our customers request insight and guidance in relation to the climate footprint of different products.  That is why we have decided to work on the first step towards a climate labeling. We see how this interest reflects on their shopping baskets with growth in sales of plant-based food products while we sell less meat,“ said Annette Juhler Kjær, Group Vice President, Public Affaires, Communications & CSR at Salling Group, at the following panel debate.

From the shopping basket to the kitchen table, sustainability is not as important. 65 percent of the Danes do not think about sustainability when they prepare their dinner, according to the study from Madkulturen.

How do we translate the green intentions into actions? This was a central question of the debate.

The Danes need to know their kitchen chords

Only a little over half the Danes has great knowledge on raw ingredients. And then it’s like playing guitar – if you only know three chords, it is not fun, but if you know 12 chords, it is far more fun to play, and the music sounds way better. When it isn’t fun to cook, the industry and convenience takes over,” said Adam Aamann, who was one of the four debate panelists along with Annette Juhler Kjær, Leif Nielsen and Johanne Schimming.

And convenience is what drives the meat consumption up. When the Danes eat takeaway, the overall part of them do not think about sustainability at all.

Leftovers are hot and raw ingredients are outdated

In making leftovers, surplus food, and legumes hot again, the 18 to 25 year olds lead the way compared to the older Danes.

However, while scoring high on the before mentioned, raw ingredients are outdated to the younger generation. The 18 to 25 year olds might know legumes but only 32 percent have great knowledge on raw ingredients.

See pictures from the event

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2019-12-09T11:07:44+00:00

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