The recipe for high performance

Lots of fibres, clever composed protein, a happy and healthy gut and a good night sleep. That’s part of the recipe for a high performing you, said experts at Nestl√© event.

Can you eat your way to a better performance in sport, at war and in everyday lives?

That was the question at the membersevent “Food for Performance” at Nestl√© Nordic in √ėrestaden. Three experts were called upon to give the answer that basically was yes – but not without conditions.

Other factors are just as important like gut health and a good night sleep. Sleep is actually the most important health factor according to research done by Susanne Wolff, Nordic Scientific Advisor at Nestle Health Science. Getting a good night sleep or the opposite affects our eating, thinking and overall performance the next day. This might be something for the food industry to take in. Start thinking in food products or ingredients that promote good sleep, as this will promote our everyday performance.

A good gut is also part of a better performing you. And the key to making your gut happy is lots of fibres. So, a diet and foods with lots of fibres is good for your health and performance. Lars Christensen, who works as a Nutritional Counsellor for F.C. Copenhagen, considered it a key industry challenge and also goal to develop food products with a higher amount of fibres.

Food affects your performance, but it’s also about the right composition of food. For the top football players at F.C. Copenhagen getting the correct composition of protein and carbs in their diet is essential to their performance. Lars Christensen said that even between a goalkeeper and an attack player the most optimal composition is different between the two.

For the Danish Sirius Patrol food is essential to their performance and thereby survival. The challenge for them is getting enough calories and especially carbs. This was one of the takeaways from S√łren Lavrsen, Lektor at VIA, who has worked with nutrition for the Danish Sirius Patrol. Even with 1,5 kilo of chocolate a day as part of their diet, it is difficult for some of the members of the patrol to get enough carbs.

S√łren Lavrsen saw a great opportunity in the stevia plant, since research suggest that stevia has a number of positive effects on age-related diseases. For the participants this was one of the perspectives that raised their attention.

One of the 60 participants was Martin Broberg, Corporate Communications Manager at Nestle Denmark:

“It was an exciting look into the future. When we join forces with Danish Food Cluster who is founded on innovation which Nestl√© also is in its’ essence, then we can create exciting topics. There were many questions from the audience and I guess we could have continued the talk for yet another hour at the event. Nestl√© Denmark will definitely continue arranging open and free events about food and health,” he said.